Start Date

13-12-2011 2:00 PM

End Date

13-12-2011 3:30 PM

Description

Agrarian reform and land reform are usually understood synonymously as they are embedded with the unequal agrarian structure in Nepal. A widespread objective of agrarian reform is to promote social justice by equitable distribution of land and resources. Agrarian reform includes the restructuring of land tenure, the means of production, and the provision of support services to the farmers and rural inhabitants.

In Nepal land is the principle determinant for classifying people into distinct classes. Due to the various state-led land grants, unequal socio-economic relations and growing population density, little ‘free’ land is available these days (Karki, 2001). More than 22 per cent of Nepalese people are landless in Nepal (CBS, 2004). Nepal has passed through many political upheavals and is experiencing diverse governing systems till date. But the issues of agrarian reform have not been properly addressed yet. Most of the landlords, who were granted state lands were not directly involved in farming but contracted with tenant farmers on a customary and hereditary basis.

Comments

Title changed. (Original Title: Rural regeneration in Post-Monarchy Nepal 尼泊爾共和國時代的鄉村建設)

Streaming Media

Recommended Citation

Karki, A. (2012, December). Tension and contradiction in agrarian reform and rural reconstruction in post-monarch Nepal. Paper presented at 2012 International Conference on Sustainability & Rural Reconstruction, Southwest University, Chongqingng, China.

 
Dec 13th, 2:00 PM Dec 13th, 3:30 PM

Tension and contradiction in agrarian reform and rural reconstruction in post-monarch Nepal

Agrarian reform and land reform are usually understood synonymously as they are embedded with the unequal agrarian structure in Nepal. A widespread objective of agrarian reform is to promote social justice by equitable distribution of land and resources. Agrarian reform includes the restructuring of land tenure, the means of production, and the provision of support services to the farmers and rural inhabitants.

In Nepal land is the principle determinant for classifying people into distinct classes. Due to the various state-led land grants, unequal socio-economic relations and growing population density, little ‘free’ land is available these days (Karki, 2001). More than 22 per cent of Nepalese people are landless in Nepal (CBS, 2004). Nepal has passed through many political upheavals and is experiencing diverse governing systems till date. But the issues of agrarian reform have not been properly addressed yet. Most of the landlords, who were granted state lands were not directly involved in farming but contracted with tenant farmers on a customary and hereditary basis.