Start Date

12-12-2011 2:00 PM

End Date

12-12-2011 3:30 PM

Description

The sustainability of small-scale cultivation, which largely characterizes Indian agriculture, though not in a homogeneous or undifferentiated manner, has been one of the important casualties of the trajectory of neo-liberal policies into which the country embarked upon in the early nineties. Driven by fiscal fundamentalism, this amounted to a veritable withdrawal of the state from economic operations, more so from agriculture. A host of policies adopted like the rationalization of input subsidies, downsizing of incentive pricing, decline in public investments, shrinking public extension services and contraction of institutional credit availability in rural areas all precipitated a widespread agrarian crisis with deflation in farm incomes and emergence of indebtedness among the peasantry (Patnaik, 2002; Reddy and Mishra, 2009; Banerjee, 2009).

The sustainability of small-scale cultivation, which largely characterizes Indian agriculture, though not in a homogeneous or undifferentiated manner, has been one of the important casualtiesofthetrajectoryofneo-liberalpoliciesintowhichthecountryembarkeduponinthe earlynineties.Drivenbyfiscalfundamentalism,thisamountedtoaveritablewithdrawalofthe statefromeconomicoperations,moresofromagriculture.Ahost ofpoliciesadoptedlikethe rationalizationofinputsubsidies,downsizingofincentivepricing,declineinpublicinvestments, shrinkingpublicextensionservicesandcontractionofinstitutionalcreditavailabilityinrural areasallprecipitatedawidespreadagrariancrisiswithdeflationinfarmincomesandemergence of indebtedness amongthe peasantry(Patnaik,2002;ReddyandMishra,2009;Banerjee, 2009).

Streaming Media

Recommended Citation

Banerjee, A. (2012, December). The impacts of neo-liberal policy on Indian peasantry = 非洲經濟及土地政策. Paper presented at 2012 International Conference on Sustainability & Rural Reconstruction, Southwest University, Chongqingng, China.

 
Dec 12th, 2:00 PM Dec 12th, 3:30 PM

The impacts of neo-liberal policy on Indian peasantry = 非洲經濟及土地政策

The sustainability of small-scale cultivation, which largely characterizes Indian agriculture, though not in a homogeneous or undifferentiated manner, has been one of the important casualties of the trajectory of neo-liberal policies into which the country embarked upon in the early nineties. Driven by fiscal fundamentalism, this amounted to a veritable withdrawal of the state from economic operations, more so from agriculture. A host of policies adopted like the rationalization of input subsidies, downsizing of incentive pricing, decline in public investments, shrinking public extension services and contraction of institutional credit availability in rural areas all precipitated a widespread agrarian crisis with deflation in farm incomes and emergence of indebtedness among the peasantry (Patnaik, 2002; Reddy and Mishra, 2009; Banerjee, 2009).

The sustainability of small-scale cultivation, which largely characterizes Indian agriculture, though not in a homogeneous or undifferentiated manner, has been one of the important casualtiesofthetrajectoryofneo-liberalpoliciesintowhichthecountryembarkeduponinthe earlynineties.Drivenbyfiscalfundamentalism,thisamountedtoaveritablewithdrawalofthe statefromeconomicoperations,moresofromagriculture.Ahost ofpoliciesadoptedlikethe rationalizationofinputsubsidies,downsizingofincentivepricing,declineinpublicinvestments, shrinkingpublicextensionservicesandcontractionofinstitutionalcreditavailabilityinrural areasallprecipitatedawidespreadagrariancrisiswithdeflationinfarmincomesandemergence of indebtedness amongthe peasantry(Patnaik,2002;ReddyandMishra,2009;Banerjee, 2009).