Publication Status

Accepted/In press

Document Type

Journal article

Department / Unit

Department of Applied Psychology

Journal Title

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Publication Date

6-25-2019

Language

English

Volume

16

Article Number

2427

Keywords

quantitative job insecurity, qualitative job insecurity, error detection, behavioral data, cognitive errors, burnout

Abstract

(1) Background: Work-related stress is a major contributor to human error. One significant workplace stressor is job insecurity, which has been linked to an increased likelihood of experiencing burnout. This, in turn, might affect human error, specifically attention-related cognitive errors (ARCES) and the ability to detect errors. ARCES can be costly for organizations and pose a safety risk. Equally detrimental effects can be caused by failure to detect errors before they can cause harm. (2) Methods: We gathered self-report and behavioral data from 148 employees working in educational, financial and medical sectors in China. We designed and piloted an error detection task in which employees had to compare fictitious customer orders to deliveries of an online shop. We tested for indirect effects using the PROCESS macro with bootstrapping (3) Results: Our findings confirmed indirect effects of job insecurity on both ARCES and the ability to detect errors via burnout. (4) Conclusions: The present research shows that job insecurity influences making and detecting errors through its relationship with burnout. These findings suggest that job insecurity could increase the likelihood for human error with potential implications for employees’ safety and the safety of others.

DOI

10.3390/ijerph16132427

ISSN

1661-7827

Fulltext file version

Final published version

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Pure ID

12831308

Pure UUID

ce07c2a0-7412-470d-8465-fb9c8e304f12

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