Title

Flexible work arrangements availability and their relationship with work-to-family conflict, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions : a comparison of three country clusters

Document Type

Journal article

Source Publication

Applied Psychology: An International Review

Publication Date

1-2012

Volume

61

Issue

1

First Page

1

Last Page

29

Abstract

The present study explored the availability of flexible work arrangements (FWA) and their relationship with manager outcomes of job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and work-to-family conflict (WFC) across country clusters. We used individualism and collectivism to explain differences in FWA availability across Latin American, Anglo, and Asian clusters. Managers from the Anglo cluster were more likely to report working in organisations that offer FWA compared to managers from other clusters. For Anglo managers, flextime was the only FWA that had significant favorable relationships with the outcome variables. For Latin Americans, part-time work negatively related with turnover intentions and strain-based WFC. For Asians, flextime was unrelated to time-based WFC, and telecommuting was positively associated with strain-based WFC. The clusters did not moderate the compressed work week and outcome relationships. Implications for practitioners adopting FWA practices across cultures are discussed.

DOI

10.1111/j.1464-0597.2011.00453.x

Print ISSN

0269994X

E-ISSN

14640597

Publisher Statement

Copyright © 2011 The Authors. Applied Psychology: An International Review © 2011 International Association of Applied Psychology

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Recommended Citation

Masuda, A. D., Poelmans, S. A. Y., Allen, T. D., Spector, P. E., Lapierre, L. M., Cooper, C. L, ... Moreno-Velazquez, I. (2012). Flexible work arrangements availability and their relationship with work-to-family conflict, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions: A comparison of three country clusters. Applied Psychology, 61(1), 1-29. doi: 10.1111/j.1464-0597.2011.00453.x