Title

'Beyond silent organizations' : a reflection of the UK Chinese people and their community organizations

Document Type

Journal article

Source Publication

Critical Social Policy

Publication Date

11-1-2007

Volume

27

Issue

4

First Page

509

Last Page

533

Publisher

Sage Publications Ltd.

Keywords

Culturally oriented services, Diversity, Organizational capacity, Weak organizations

Abstract

The UK Chinese community has long been perceived to have a high degree of solidarity and self-sufficiency. On the other hand, it is argued that the sense of community and mutual help among Chinese people has been weakened by their competitive approach to business. Based on findings from an ESRC-funded national study of the UK Chinese people's help-seeking behaviour, this study found that Chinese people, both where their population is dispersed and where it is concentrated, actively formed organizations to meet their social and cultural needs. However, Chinese organizations were weakened by inadequate resources and the diverse needs of different Chinese groups. Thus, the UK Chinese people were neither self-sufficient nor isolated from each other. The experiences of Chinese organizations further show that in spite of government expectations of community organizations, state input has been mainly in terms of regulations and control. Without financial support, UK Chinese organizations will slip from being weak organizations into `silent' ones.

DOI

10.1177/0261018307081810

Print ISSN

02610183

E-ISSN

1461703X

Funding Information

Economic and Social Research Council provided the authors with a grant for conducting the study (award reference: R000223924).{R000223924}

Publisher Statement

Copyright © 2007 Sage Publications Ltd. Access to external full text or publisher's version may require subscription.

Full-text Version

Publisher’s Version

Language

English

Recommended Citation

Chan, C. K., Cole, B., & Bowpitt, G. (2007). 'Beyond silent organizations': A reflection of the UK Chinese people and their community organizations. Critical Social Policy, 27(4), 509-533. doi: 10.1177/0261018307081810

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