Title

Risk, residence, and the post-Fordist city

Document Type

Journal article

Source Publication

American Behavioral Scientist

Publication Date

11-1-1997

Volume

41

Issue

3

First Page

342

Last Page

359

Publisher

SAGE Publications Ltd

Abstract

In talking about dualized, polarized, and post-Fordist cities, it is often forgotten that major heterogeneities exist within neighborhoods and within the middle masses. Individualization and autonomization can be seen as the major causes of these heterogeneities. Because individual biographies and life course decisions increasingly have to be constructed personally, the differences between people and households cannot only be found between classes and between different areas but also within these classes and areas. Households that may appear very similar in terms of standard social indicators may in fact be highly differentiated in relation to wider social resources, lifestyles, career paths, and prospects. Private solutions and safeguards against health, employment, and other risks create a greater diversity of circumstances. Individualization and autonomization affect all kinds of other processes, such as residential mobility, and coping strategies.

DOI

10.1177/0002764297041003006

Print ISSN

00027642

E-ISSN

15523381

Publisher Statement

Copyright © 1997 American Behavioral Scientist.

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Recommended Citation

Forrest, R., & Kennett, P. (1997). Risk, residence, and the post-Fordist city. American Behavioral Scientist, 41(3), 342-359. doi: 10.1177/0002764297041003006