Title

Long-term changes in prices, wages and the size of the monetary economy in pre-industrial China 1000-1770

Document Type

Book chapter

Source Publication

遗大投艰集 : 纪念梁方仲教授诞辰一百周年(上)

Publication Date

2012

First Page

437

Last Page

499

Publisher

Guangzhou

Abstract

Would historians have viewed China in the post-Song time as a transition from a major leading civilization towards a stagnant agrarian empire, even though it still could sustain a population as large as 0.3 billion in 1775. In a seminal comparative study of economic growth in world history, the economic historian Eric Jones makes the startling argument that Song China exhibited intensive growth (economic growth per capita), preceding both Tokugawa Japan and seventeenth-century Britain by more than five centuries.

While Jones does point to the rise in real income per capita during the Song period, it seems to me that one of the implicit questions generated by his study is the following: why did the intensive growth fail to continue in the ensuing dynasties? Were social upheavals such as the Mongol invasion one crucial factor in this downward turn?

Additional Information

ISBN of the source publication: 9787218084985

Recommended Citation

Liu, G. W. (2012). Long-term changes in prices, wages and the size of the monetary economy in pre-industrial China 1000-1770. In 陈春声, 刘志伟(Eds.), 遗大投艰集 : 纪念梁方仲教授诞辰一百周年 (pp.437-499). Guangzhou: Guangdong Peoples Publishing House.

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