Title

Using response behaviour theory to solicit survey participation in consumer research: An empirical study

Document Type

Journal article

Source Publication

Journal of Marketing Management

Publication Date

2012

Volume

28

Issue

9-10

First Page

1174

Last Page

1189

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to report on research that examines survey participation rates (i.e. response rates) for personal interview surveys where solicitation for participation is based on different theories of survey-response behaviour in two culturally distinct countries. Field experiments were designed to investigate the extent to which the theories of exchange, cognitive dissonance, self-perception, and involvement/commitment can influence potential respondents to participate in a personal interview survey in Australia and Hong Kong. The results show that there were significant differences in Australia with the theory of self-perception having the strongest impact on survey-response behaviour, while cognitive dissonance has the least impact. In contrast, the effects in Hong Kong were not significant. This study adds to the limited empirical research regarding why consumers participate in surveys, particularly personal interview surveys. The theories are applied at the self-introduction and invitation to participate, which is a crucial stage in the potential respondent's decision about participation.

DOI

10.1080/0267257X.2011.619148

Print ISSN

0267257X

E-ISSN

14721376

Publisher Statement

Copyright © Taylor and Francis

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Full-text Version

Publisher’s Version

Recommended Citation

Evangelista, F., Poon, P. & Albaum, G. (2012) Using response behaviour theory to solicit survey participation in consumer research: An empirical study. Journal of Marketing Management, 28(9-10), 1174-1189. DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/0267257X.2011.619148