Title

Systematic review of research evidence in the UK between 1997 and 2010 on : preferences for place of care and death

Document Type

Presentation

Source Publication

The 12th Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care : Palliative Care Reaching Out

Publication Date

5-20-2011

Publisher

European Association for Palliative Care

Abstract

Research aims: Enabling patients to die in their place of choice is an important policy issue in the UK. Several recent papers suggest, however, that the evidence underlying these policies may be more complex than initially thought, with, for example, preferences being situation-dependent. This study therefore aims to review the evidence related to preferences for place of care and place of death between 1997 and 2010 in the UK.

Method: Six databases (AMED, EMBASE, OVID MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsyInfo, BNI (1997-2007) were searched. Inclusion criteria were primary studies based in the UK; reflecting patients’ and/or carers’ perspectives; published between 1997 and 2010.

Results: Following abstract and full paper review, 19 of 4558 citations met inclusion criteria. Preferred place of death differs from preferred place of care. Home remains the ideal place of death for many, but it is qualified by speculation about patients’ changing circumstances. Hence, patients and their carers may prefer to die or be cared for in a hospice, although some ethnic groups (particularly Chinese elders) may perceive hospice as repositories of ‘inauspicious’ care. Most participants dislike dying in a hospital, but many did not reject the idea of being cared for in a hospital. Receiving care or dying in a care home is very unpopular. Many studies had substantial missing data, so complete and more sensitive records of preference are needed in future studies.

Conclusions: In the UK, home is considered to be an ideal but unrealistic place of care and death by many participants. Hospice seems to be the most popular alternative preferred place of care and death. Many participants were willing to be cared for in a hospital but most dislike the idea of dying there. Receiving care or dying in a care home were viewed negatively. This study is funded by the Cancer Experiences Collaborative.

Recommended Citation

Hui V. K.-Y., Bailey C., & Addington-Hall, J. (2011, May). Systematic review of research evidence in the UK between 1997 and 2010 on: Preferences for place of care and death. Paper presented at the 12th Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care: Palliative Care Reaching Out, Lisbon, Portugal.

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