Title

History as effects of power

Document Type

Journal article

Source Publication

Arcadia

Publication Date

11-2004

Volume

39

Issue

2

First Page

312

Last Page

321

Publisher

Walter de Gruyter GmbH

Abstract

Like any other type of human discourse, history writing should not be viewed as an objective enterprise whose implicit telos is to seek truth; rather, it should be treated as a sphere of conflicting social interests and asymmetrical power-relations. To understand the past, therefore, we not only have to analyze verbal disputes that frequently occur between individual speakers and writers but also need to watch out for the ideological presence that has infiltrated virtually all social institutions.

DOI

10.1515/arca.39.2.312

Print ISSN

00037982

E-ISSN

16130642

Publisher Statement

Copyright © Walter De Gruyter & Company 2004

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Full-text Version

Publisher’s Version

Recommended Citation

Ding, E. (2004). History as effects of power. Arcadia, 39(2), 312-321. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/arca.39.2.312