Title

Women in philosophy : problems with the discrimination hypothesis

Document Type

Journal article

Source Publication

Academic Questions

Publication Date

12-10-2014

Volume

27

Issue

4

First Page

461

Last Page

473

Publisher

National Association of Scholars (NAS)

Abstract

A number of philosophers attribute the underrepresentation of women in philosophy largely to bias against women or some kind of wrongful discrimination. They cite six sources of evidence to support their contention: (1) gender disparities that increase along the path from undergraduate student to full-time faculty member; (2) anecdotal accounts of discrimination in philosophy; (3) research on gender bias in the evaluation of manuscripts, grants, and curricula vitae in other academic disciplines; (4) psychological research on implicit bias; (5) psychological research on stereotype threat; and (6) the relatively small number of articles written from a feminist perspective in leading philosophy journals. In each case, we find that proponents of the discrimination hypothesis, who include distinguished philosophers in fields such as philosophy of science, metaphysics, and philosophy of language, have tended to present evidence selectively. Occasionally they have even presented as evidence what appears to be something more dubious—for example, studies supporting the discrimination hypothesis based on data that have been reported “lost” under suspicious circumstances. It is not the aim of this paper to settle the question of the causes of female underrepresentation in philosophy. Rather, we argue that, contrary to what many philosophers claim, the overall information available does not support the discrimination hypothesis.

DOI

10.1007/s12129-014-9464-x

Print ISSN

08954852

E-ISSN

19364709

Publisher Statement

Copyright © Springer 2014. Access to external full text or publisher's version may require subscription.

Full-text Version

Publisher’s Version

Recommended Citation

Sesardic, N., & De Clercq, R. (2014). Women in philosophy: Problems with the discrimination hypothesis. Academic Questions, 27(4), 461-473. doi: 10.1007/s12129-014-9464-x