Start Date

12-12-2011 2:00 PM

End Date

12-12-2011 3:30 PM

Description

Brazil is probably the only country that experienced a deep and complex process of growth and promote economic development without substantial change on the issue of land ownership. Since the Portuguese colonization, through the Land Act of 1850 and throughout the process of industrialization experienced in the twentieth century and still in progress, the land question remained almost unchanged, despite the advances resulting from the growing social and economic contradictions and the related violence observed in the field. Western Europe and countries like the United States (Homestead Act of 1862), China (the Great Leap Forward of 1959) and USSR (after the Revolution of 1917) at some point, and in different ways, have promoted the massive access population to land, and even Latin American neighbors such as Argentina, have forged more open societies with regard to land ownership (see policies implemented colonization of the territory in the nineteenth century) than the Brazilian.

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Recommended Citation

Faleiros, R., Faleiros, R. N., & Vargas, N. C. (2012, December). The limits of Agrarian reform in Brazil = 巴西土地改革的局限. Paper presented at 2012 International Conference on Sustainability & Rural Reconstruction, Southwest University, Chongqingng, China.

 
Dec 12th, 2:00 PM Dec 12th, 3:30 PM

The limits of Agrarian reform in Brazil = 巴西土地改革的局限

Brazil is probably the only country that experienced a deep and complex process of growth and promote economic development without substantial change on the issue of land ownership. Since the Portuguese colonization, through the Land Act of 1850 and throughout the process of industrialization experienced in the twentieth century and still in progress, the land question remained almost unchanged, despite the advances resulting from the growing social and economic contradictions and the related violence observed in the field. Western Europe and countries like the United States (Homestead Act of 1862), China (the Great Leap Forward of 1959) and USSR (after the Revolution of 1917) at some point, and in different ways, have promoted the massive access population to land, and even Latin American neighbors such as Argentina, have forged more open societies with regard to land ownership (see policies implemented colonization of the territory in the nineteenth century) than the Brazilian.