Title

Challenges and opportunities in inter-institutional collaboration in digital scholarship

Event Title

Meeting at the Crossroads: Collaboration across Departments and Institutions - A Joint Conference Presented by the Library and ITSC

Streaming Media

Additional Streaming Media

Document Type

Conferences

Language

English

Location

MBG06, G/F, Patrick Lee Wan Keung Academic Building, Lingnan University

Start Date

17-11-2017 3:45 PM

End Date

17-11-2017 4:30 PM

Description

Many schools have recently embarked upon initiatives in digital scholarship – those forms of scholarship largely in the humanities and humanistic social sciences that emphasize digital tools and infrastructure, as well as accompanying expertise and support. These initiatives bring new challenges, such as meeting the growing demand for technical support from faculty and students with trained staff and necessary hardware and software. Even institutions with well-established programs struggle to keep pace.

As a way to address this challenge, we have been envisioning a staff exchange that would allow for schools to share staff across institutions to provide expertise that is not available within their institution, and which would establish a powerful network of collaborators to advance the field.

In this talk, I’ll show some examples of digital scholarship to provide some context, share some of the findings of a planning grant that has helped us conceptualize the exchange, and discuss in some detail some of the core principles that need to be in place for such an exchange to succeed. These principles, based on the work of Yochai Benchler, may be of particular interest for anyone considering the creation of a non-market based approach to working together on projects of any kin.

Presenter Bios


Michael Roy, Dean of the Middlebury College library
Michael Roy serves as the Dean of the Middlebury College library, which in collaboration with various campus partners provides library and academic technology services for Middlebury's undergraduate college, as well as for the Bread Loaf School of English, summer Language Schools, and the Middlebury Institute for International Studies at Monterery. Current initiatives within the library include implementing a new repository in support of a newly approved Open Access policy, re-thinking Information Literacy, and identifying strategies for sustaining new modes of faculty and student research, particularly in the digital humanities and high performance computing. Roy serves as the founding chair of the Oversight Committee of the Lever Press, a recently launched Open Access monograph press.

Mike Roy.pdf (3305 kB)
Presentation powerpoint

Recommended Citation

Roy, M. (2017, November). Challenges and opportunities in inter-institutional collaboration in digital scholarship. Presented at the crossroads: Collaboration across departments and institutions: A joint conference presented by the Library and ITSC, Lingnan University, Hong Kong.

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Nov 17th, 3:45 PM Nov 17th, 4:30 PM

Challenges and opportunities in inter-institutional collaboration in digital scholarship

MBG06, G/F, Patrick Lee Wan Keung Academic Building, Lingnan University

Many schools have recently embarked upon initiatives in digital scholarship – those forms of scholarship largely in the humanities and humanistic social sciences that emphasize digital tools and infrastructure, as well as accompanying expertise and support. These initiatives bring new challenges, such as meeting the growing demand for technical support from faculty and students with trained staff and necessary hardware and software. Even institutions with well-established programs struggle to keep pace.

As a way to address this challenge, we have been envisioning a staff exchange that would allow for schools to share staff across institutions to provide expertise that is not available within their institution, and which would establish a powerful network of collaborators to advance the field.

In this talk, I’ll show some examples of digital scholarship to provide some context, share some of the findings of a planning grant that has helped us conceptualize the exchange, and discuss in some detail some of the core principles that need to be in place for such an exchange to succeed. These principles, based on the work of Yochai Benchler, may be of particular interest for anyone considering the creation of a non-market based approach to working together on projects of any kin.